John Dalla-Zuanna Receives OZTek 2015 Outstanding Achievement Award

OZTek 2015 Technical Diver of the Year, OZTek 2015 Industry Recognition Award, OZTek 2015 Outstanding Achievement Award, OZTek 2015 Media Excellence Award, John Dalla-Zuanna, Richard Vevers, Richard Evans, Lance Robb. OZTek 2015 Award Winners, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, The OZTek Awards celebrate the achievements and endeavours of Australia’s leading Divers and Dive Industry personnel – the people who have helped push the boundaries of knowledge and exploration in the field of advanced and technical diving.

On Sunday 15th March 2015, during the Gala Award Ceremony, previous OZTEk award winner Dr Richard ‘Harry’ Harris announced OZTek’s 2015 Outstanding Achievement Award. This is what Harry had to say to packed audience of advanced and technical diving movers and shakers.

“It is an enormous honour to be asked by the OZTek Organisers to present this very well deserved award to a close friend, a wonderful dive budy, a mentor and a constant voice of reason in the mad world of technical diving!

I would like to break with tradition and ask this man – John Dalla-Zuanna – to come and join me up here, whilst I tell you why he is such a special guy in this great sport of ours.

At the cheeky young age of just 58, JDZ is truly a veteran of the sport of cave and technical diving. Cave diving in Australia started pretty much at the time JDZ started cave diving, so it is impossible to consider one without the other. Around the time the CDAA became incorporated in 1973, JDZ started visiting the Mount Gambier area. He cut a fine figure in Piccaninnie Ponds with his Moray suit! He became qualified in 1975 as member #256 and from that time on was inspired by the sport. A trip in the late 70’s to Florida to meet Sheck Exlley, Wes Skiles and Woody Jasper quickly led to adopting sidemount diving, and feeling the thrill of laying line in virgin passage.

OZTek 2015 Harry Harris and JOhn Dalla Zuanna by Rosemary E Lunn

Dr ‘Harry’ Harris introducing cave diver John Dalla-Zuanna at the 2015 OZTek Award Dinner Photo Credit: Rosemary E Lunn / The Underwater Marketing Company

Thus the passion was born and returned to Australia and began teaching both open water and cave diving. He has reached the highest levels of recreational and cave diving instructor. And, as a long time FAUI instructor, a PADI Course Director and CDAA Advanced Cave instructor, countless students have come under his thoughtful and methodical influence. The CDAA has benefited enormously from John’s vision for cave diving, and he has filled a voluntary position with that organisation in some form or another almost continuously. Ken Smith always said that he used to think cave diving politics were a matter of life and death, and now he realises it is much more serious! JDZ has been a calming influence on all factions of the CDAA for many yearss and is unique in that he is respected and heard by all sides.

OZTek 2015, cave diving explorer, Paul Hosie, Craig Challen, Ken Smith, Wetmules, John Dalla-Zuanna, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, technical diving, scuba diving, The Underwater Marketing Company

Cave diving explorer Paul Hosie @ OZTek.15 Photo Credit: Rosemary E Lunn

I met John at OZTek in, I think, 2003. We had been exchanging emails for awhile and I was about to leave to live in Vanuatu. John had built a rebreather heads up display from an LED light and a mobile phone vibrating motor! He generously gave me this device to put onto my KISS rebreather, which considerably enhanced the safety of my cave exploration at the the time.

After my stint in Vanuatu JDZ was one of the instructors on my penetration course and we struck up a real friendship underscored by our passion for caves, rebreathers and exploration. John had dived in so many caves around the world and along with guys like Paul Hosie, Craig Challen and Ken Smith, I quickly found a group of experienced cave divers who mentored me into the world of exploration and expedition diving. I am sure John has had a major impact on many other peoples’ lives, the way he has influenced mine.

JDZ’s ingenuity goes way back. He built a radio detection device called ‘the Thumper’ which played no small part in the mapping of Mount Gambier’s showpiece, ‘Tank Cave’. John was an early adopter of closed circuit rebreathers, and along with Tubby McKenzie the early leaky valve CCR Dolphin was born and dived to 85 metres on the Bayonet in the ships graveyard in Victoria. It was this creation that caught my eye and got me into rebreathers in 2002.

John the inventor became an indispensable part of the Wetmules team. (Moto: Lurching from crisis to crisis). His lithium scooter batteries propelled Craig Challen and I to the end of Cocklebiddy in 2008, where Craig added new line to the end of the cave. They also now famously caused the fire which burnt my car to the ground on the way home! His early 12 volt heated undergarments kept us warm in the Pearse Resurgence and his wonderful pasta kept us fed.

OZTek 2015. Dr Harry Harris, battery fire, Cocklebiddy Cave Exploration, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Dr ‘Harry’ Harris contemplating the fact that his beloved Mk15.5 rebreather was now a blackened blob inside the burnt out shell of his Nissan Patrol. (Along with all his other diving equipment, camera system, camping equipment, laptop and clothing). Harry was his way home from a two week cave diving trip to Australia’s famous Cocklebiddy Cave in summer 2008, when he spotted smoke in the rear view mirror. 10 minutes after pulling over, everything was destroyed by fire.

John is a regular ocean and wreck diver. He has numerous sub 100 metre / 328 feet wreck dives to his credit and continues to teach young divers open water diving through the La Trobe university club, sharing his passion for all things aquatic. His huge passion right now is the 3D mapping of cave using a combination of video and gaming technology, and in this area he is becoming a world leader. I hope many of you got to see his talk on this today. As the current Site Director of CDAA he shows no sign of letting up, and I look foward to sharing many more dives with this wonderful friend and great ambassador for the sport of technical diving.

2015 OZTek Speakers, Heather Hamza, Alberto Nava, Richard Nicholls, Jayne Jenkins, Richard Taylor, Paul Raymaekers, Ben Reymenants, Liz Rogers, Dave Ross, Ken Smith, Lance Robb, Martin Parker, Simon Pridmore, Sue Crowe, Rod Macdonald, Daren Marshall, Barry McGill, Pete Mesley, Rosemary E Lunn, Simon Mitchell, David Strike, Dr Catherine Meehan, Michael Menduno, Richard 'Harry' Harris, Lamar Hires, Paul Hosie, Deborah Johnston, Richard Lundgren, Heather Hamza, Liam Allen, Michael Aw, Peter Buzzacott, Matt Carter, Steve Cox, John Dalla-Zuanna, John Garvin, Laura James, Paul Haynes, Paul Toomer,

The 2015 OZTek Speakers

John Dalla-Zuanna, please accept this Outstanding Achievement Award for your long standing contributions to cave and technical diving.”

 

buzzoole code

Lego Launches Dr Sylvia Earle MiniFig

Dr Sylvia Earle, Lego, female scientist minifig family, NOAA,  Marine Biologist, Duke University, TED Talks, U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, deep sea explorer, oceans, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Women Divers Hall Of Fame,

Dr Sylvia Earle is now a LEGO minifig

 

LEGO is manufacturing a female scientist minifig family. The collection pays homage to real life aerospace engineers and astronauts. My favourite piece however is a touching tribute to deep sea explorer Dr Sylvia Earle.

“I want to get out in the water. I wanted to see fish, real fish, not fish in a laboratory.”

Dr Earle was the first female chief scientist of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. She has logged over 7,000 hours underwater and led over 100 expeditions as an scientist, author, lecturer, and explorer.

“No ocean, no life. No blue, no green. No ocean, no us.”

In August Women Divers Hall of Fame Fellow Sylvia Earle will be 80 and she doesn’t seem to be slowing down. Her self imposed mission of protecting the world’s oceans has inspired millions to learn to dive or pursue careers in marine biology.

Wholly fitting therefore that this quiet lady is now a LEGO figure, gently influencing the next generation, through play, to think about what happens in our seas.

With 23 Years Of Hindsight – Rigging Options For Diving

A recent post on a diving forum stated “sidemounting is just a fad”.

New(er) divers to the sport could be forgiven for thinking this style of scuba diving is a recent phenomenon.

Cave Photography, Gavin Newman, Mike Thomas, Cave Diving Group, CDG 50th Anniversary, Wookey Hole, Drager Dolphin rebreather, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Two Brit Cave Divers marking the CDG’s 50th Anniversary by diving Wookey Hole, June 1996 Photo Credit: Gavin Newman

Sidemounting was actually invented in the 1960s by the Brits. They were exploring sites such as Wookey Hole, Swildons Cave and other underground systems, and would often find ‘the way on’ was blocked by a submerged passageway called a sump. In order to explore further, these sumps needed to be navigated.

British sumps tend to be short, cramped, flooded passageways, therefore buoyancy is not an issue nor is the use of fins. Cavers just needed a means to be able to breath and (sometimes) see where they were pushing. The caver would attach a cylinder and regulator to their body using a robust belt that allowed the cylinder to be worn against the body. This ‘English system’ of cylinder rigging allowed the explorer to crawl through both dry and wet sections of cave and keep on pushing the system.

During the 1970s the ‘English system’ was adopted across the pond by Floridian cave divers. These cave systems tended to be properly flooded with the emphasis on diving to explore the cave. Buoyancy, trim and propulsion became an issue, hence cylinders were moved from the waist / thigh area, up towards the armpit and against the torso.  Once again, these divers made their own rigging system. However it wasn’t until the mid 1990s that the first commercial sidemount diving system was manufactured by Dive Rite. This was designed by Lamar Hires, a renowned cave explorer and instructor. 

The following article by Michael Menduno is reprinted from the pioneering American journal for technical diving, aquaCORPS, V4, MIX, January-February 1992.

Though double (twinset) tanks and stage bottles are generally a requirement for most technical diving operations, diving sets vary significantly depending on the specific application and diving environment. Here’s a look at some of the more common methods of set rigging as practiced today in the “doubles community.”

Squeezing By – authored by Lamar Hires

Lamar Hires, Jared Hires, Lee Ann Hires, Bob Janowski, Michael Menduno, aquaCORPS Magazine, Dive Rite, sidemount diving, technical diving, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, XRay Magazine

A Floridian sidemount rig from the early 1990’s, before Dive Rite released their TransPac system Image Credit: Bob Janowski

Originally developed for the tight low visibility sump diving that is common in Europe, sidemounts allowed spelunkers to more easily transport single cylinders through a dry cave to the dive site. In North Florida, the use of sidemount techniques has allowed exploration into small silty areas that were once thought impassable and has opened up entire new cave systems that were simply inaccessible with back mounted doubles.

Sidemounts reduce the strain of carrying heavy doubles up steep inclines, lowering cylinders down into a hole, and making those long walks through the woods to the dive site. Cave systems known to be silty can now be penetrated without heavy silting. Sidemount configuration means wearing the cylinders on the hips instead of the back. The cylinders are fastened in the middle with a snap to a harness at the waist. The necks are clipped off at the armpit using bungee material (a bicycle inner tube is preferred) so that the cylinders are forced to lay parallel to the diver’s body. Adjustments are usually needed at first to insure a snug comfortable fit.

When diving with sidemounts, gas supplies must be balanced for adequate reserves throughout the dive. The regulator and SPG hoses no longer lay across the back and instead are clipped across the chest area. The management of these is critical for proper monitoring of gas supplies and switching regulators during the dive. Back-up and emergency equipment must be streamlined and tucked away to achieve the desired profile—no thicker than two cylinders that lay along the diver’s hips.

Clearly, sidemount diving is not for everyone because of the potential hazards that exist; low visibility, line traps and squeezes that seem to get smaller and smaller are only a few of the obstacles to be overcome. A diver must be totally comfortable in all these conditions before considering sidemount as an alternative. Suitably equipped, divers who are, can usually find a way to squeeze by.

China Cult – authored by Billy Deans 

Billy Deans, Joel Silverstein, Michael Menduno, aquaCORPS Magazine, SS Andrea Doria, Poseidon, doubles, twinset, technical diving, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, XRay Magazine,

Technical diving pioneer and educator Billy Deans Image Credit: Joel Silverstein

Previously isolated from the underground and fellow wreckers to the south, the east coast wreck diving community evolved its own style of set rigging suitable for the cold dark waters of the north and the available technology. Still seen on the boats that work the Doria, Texas Tower, the Virginia and the San Diego, a typical east coast wreck diving set consists of a pair of double 80s or 95s (10.5 or 11.5 liter) or secured to a large capacity BCD jacket with a manifold system, or commonly two independent regulators, which are rotated throughout the dive.

A 40cf (5.5 liter) pony mounted between the doubles serves as a bailout, along with a handmade upreel (hemp rope wrapped around a forearm-length aluminum spindle). For the most part, stage bottles, typically air, are something divers leave tied off to the anchor line at 10ft (3m), and oxygen for decompression is still used sparingly, if at all.

Now with the advent of larger tanks, harness and manifold systems, improved decompression methods and mix technology, all that is changing. Today, a well-outfitted high tech wreck diver carries a pair of cold-filled Genesis 120s (14.5 liter) with DIN crossover manifold and valve protectors, shoulder mounted stage bottles, or ‘wing tanks’, containing decompression gas (EAN and or oxygen)—do you really want to bet your tissues on that cylinder clipped off to the anchor line? Harness, bag and back plate system, argon inflation system and of course an upreel.

The result? Wreck divers are staying down longer, getting more of that first class china, and most importantly are doing it safer. After all, when you come right down to it, the most valuable artifact that you’ll ever bring home is yourself.

To read the full article, click here

First Published: X-Ray MagazineMay 2015 Issue 66, Page 78

Are You An Ardent Muck Diver?

Can you spare 5 minutes to help Maarten Debrauwer with his PhD research?

Maarten Debrauwer, PhD research, Hairy Frogfish, Southeast Asia, cryptobenthic fauna, ‎frogfishes‬, ‎ghostpipe fish, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, XRay Magazine, Eric Hanauer, Muck Diving, Scuba Diving, Rebreathers
Maarten is doing his PhD on cryptobenthic fauna – ‪#‎frogfishes‬,‪#‎ghostpipefishes‬ etc – in Southeast Asia. As part of his research he has a survey about these little critters. The survey investigates which species are most popular with ‪#‎divers‬ who are interested in muck diving.

Maarten Debrauwer, PhD research, Hairy Frogfish, Southeast Asia, cryptobenthic fauna, ‎frogfishes‬, ‎ghostpipe fish, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, XRay Magazine, Eric Hanauer, Muck Diving, Scuba Diving, Rebreathers

It is part of a larger scientific research-project that investigates the ecology and threats of cryptic marine fauna in Southeast Asia. To better protect these species, it is crucial to know the key characteristics of muck dive tourism.

Muck diving is a distinct type of diving that mostly occurs over sand or mud areas, with little or no coral reef. The focus of muck diving is on finding small critters that are rarely encountered on coral reefs.

The survey should take no more than 5 minutes to complete. Participating in this survey is entirely voluntary and your identity cannot be connected in any way to your survey answers, and you can opt out at any time.

To access the survey please follow this link and you can email Maarten here.

Want to know more about ‪#‎MuckDiving‬? Here’s a link to an article in X-Ray Magazine by Eric Hanauer.

Wanted! A Backplate As Strong As Steel, With The Weight Of Ali

It would seem that Dive Rite has the answer with the launch of their next generation backplate, the XT Lite.

Spotted at New York’s 2015 Beneath The Sea Dive Show, this eye catching backplate is manufactured from marine grade 316 stainless steel. (316 is the preferred steel for use in marine environments because it has a greater resistance to corrosion, hence surgical steel is also made from 316 grade stainless).

Dive Rite, Lamar Hires, Jared Hires, XT Lite Backplate, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, twinset, diving doubles, scuba diving, technical diving, Florida cave diving

Dive Rite has a simple solution. They have lost the excess weight, whilst ensuring the strength of the backplate is not compromised, by laser cutting a series of cut-outs from the body of the plate. The plate is then hand finished to ensure that there are no rough or jagged edges.

It is good to see that the Dive Rite has considered that divers have changing needs for their kit. The XT Lite backplate has two sets of 2 inch slots cut along the centre spine so that the plate can be dived with a single cylinder without the need of a single tank adapter. Plus a series of 3/8 inch holes and 1 inch slots have also been cut along the outer edge of the plate, thus giving the diver a plethora of choice when it comes to mounting lights, lift bags, pony bottles and other paraphernalia. And the ever useful crotch strap has not been forgotten either. There is a slot cut for that too.

As you would expect, Dive Rite have complied with the standard twinset / doubles bolt setup measurement of 11 inches between the two holes. But that is no surprise. Dive Rite introduced this measurement back in 1984 when it started manufacturing backplates. This measurement was then adopted by the tech community.

First Published: X-Ray MagazineMay 2015 Issue 66, Page 51

‘Just Where Do I Put All My Dive Kit’?

Hurrah! A fresh solution that stops that frustrating moment of ‘just where do I put all my stuff’?

Apeks Tech Shorts, XRay Magazine, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, scuba diving, rebreathers, storing spools, cargo pockets, streamline , DEMA Show 2014Ardent drysuited divers will probably all agree that there are many joys of diving in a wetsuit. A wetsuit is quick and easy to don and you are most likely to be diving in warm(er) waters. What a treat! Kit up goes really smoothly until you hit that horrible moment of ‘bother, I miss my drysuit cargo pockets. Just where do I put all my stuff? Spare mask, wetnotes, reel, line markers or delayed surface marker buoy and cuddly toy’?

There are two solutions. Get cargo pockets added to your suit or go for the quicker, easier option – wear a pair of diving shorts. Currently there is a choice of diving shorts on the market. Most of them keep the shorts secure with a drawstring at the waist. This works, but it is not an optimal solution.

I was therefore curious to see at the 2014 Las Vegas DEMA Show that Apeks have looked at this product with fresh thinking and walked a different path. Their solution for securing these Tech shorts? An adjustable waistband augmented by an adjustable belt.

How does this work? Think nappies! Simply pull on the shorts and get them comfortable. Then grab the left hand back flap and wrap it around your left hand hip and over your left stomach area. Next you grab the front left hand flap and velcro it on top before repeating the same process over your right hand hip. Finally you clip the belt home and your shorts are nicely secure. The waist band is wide and there is velcro aplenty on the flaps so that you benefit from great adjustability and a snug fit.

Apeks Tech Shorts, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, XRay Magazine, DEMA Show 2014The two large cargo pockets have been designed to reduce flap whilst providing flexibility of use to the diver. Each pocket has an ‘expansion system’ fitted to the outside of the pocket. Basically velco tabs that allow you to velcro down or release the pocket, so that you can use the pocket just for wetnotes, or truly stuff it to full capacity. Time to explore inside a pocket and you will be pleased to know that you can clip off and secure your pocket contents to the stainless steel integrated D-Rings. The pocket should be quick to drain courtesy of 4 large grommets and the pocket itself is secured and closed by a large velcro pocket flap that keeps everything in place.

In summary, Apeks have designed and manufactured quite a sophisticated pair of unisex diving shorts. With a choice of 5 sizes – small through to extra large – I can see they will quickly become the dive short of choice for many divers. And for drysuit divers who don’t have cargo pockets, this might be an economical solution to your storage issues.

First Published: X-Ray MagazineMay 2015 Issue 66, Page 51

“Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish” wins Emmy for Laura James

Laura James, Puget Sound, Seastars, Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish, Star Fish Wasting Syndrome, Meg Rebreather, GUE, Seattle, This Girl Can Dive, Sea Otters v. Climate Change, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving, female divers, sea hero, Cox Conservation Hero, Sustainable West Seattle,

Laura James in her beloved Puget Sound

Talk to filmaker and underwater explorer Laura James for five minutes, and the name ‘Puget Sound‘ will be mentioned in the conversation somewhere. You soon learn this is no coincidence. Laura’s self imposed mission is to share the undersea world of this Washington State Sound in such a way that people discover what is going on beneath the waves, and learn to love and protect the Sound as much as she does.

It does help that this self-effacing West Seattle advocate is a respected, Emmy award winning, accomplished recreational, technical and rebreather diver with north of 5,000 dives underneath her belt. Using the power of film and journalism she highlights pollution problems and other environmental factors that impact on this inlet of the Pacific Ocean.

In 2013 Laura James collaboratived on a report ‘Sea Otters v. Climate Change’ and won an Emmy Award for her photography in June 2014. The report was honoured as best ‘health / science feature / segment’.

On 6th June 2015 Laura earned her second Emmy in the ‘Environmental Feature / Segment’ category for her story ‘Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish‘.

Drained: Urban Stormwater Pollution, Laura James, Halcyon, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving, leading female diver, environmentalist, sea hero, scuba diver, Megalodon rebreather, Global Underwater Explorers

Laura is an active GUE and Megalodon CCR diver

“I had noticed on my dives in Puget Sound that the starfish were getting sick, deteriorating and subsequently dying quite rapidly. Other people had reported it, but nothing was happening about this mass mortality event, and I felt the ‘Star Fish Wasting Syndrome‘ needed highlighting.

Reports starting surfacing from Alaska to as far south as San Diego of tens of thousands of starfish dying. This raised the question of whether this starfish die-off was an indicator of a larger problem. At first it seemed only to affect one species known as the Sunflower Starfish (or Seastar). Then it hit another species, and another. In all about a dozen species of Seastars were dying along the Pacific westcoast.

I was fortunate that I had an amazing team of dive buddies behind me, helping make the video dives possible.  I had pitched the story a number of times, but no one bit until I shot the first batch of footage and then it took off. I worked with husband and wife team, Michael Werner and Katie Campbell.

I knew that Katie would be perfect to produce this and do the story justice after working with her on ‘Drained: Urban Stormwater Pollution‘. (This video won the Society of Professional Journalists award for Best Online Video for the Western Washington Chapter and was nominated for two Emmys. And it was also featured in the Reel Water Film Festival and Sea Cinema Film Festival.) We make a great team – Katie and Michael filmed the topside footage – whilst Lamont Granquist and I shot the underwater stock.

Laura James, Congressman Danny Heck, Sunflower Starfish, Starfish, Seastar, Puget Sound, Michael Werner, GUE, scuba diving, Seattle, Katie Campbell, Environmental Emmy, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Laura James with her 2015 Emmy Award

It was important to me that we got citizen scientists involved with this project. The big problem we had with this epidemic is that there was no baseline. Quite simply the starfish got sick and we noticed this. We needed a way to show this in real time – how it was spreading – hence we built a website to track posts to media sites using #SickStarfish. We encouraged Pacific divers to take photos of starfish and and hash tag it ‘SickStarfish‘.

I must admit I am still pretty stunned to receive this award because we were up against a great story about wolves. This Emmy is very pretty special to me. The story we created felt like my baby, from pitching it, shooting compelling underwater footage and then watching it grow and reach a national audience.

I want to shoot stories that connect with non-divers, that bring them along, without spoon-feeding or dumbing down the content. Jacques Cousteau brought diving stories into our living room. He invited us to join him on a grand undersea adventure. I don’t have grand undersea adventures, I have environmental stories about Puget Sound that once heard, can help make a positive difference. Probably the most amazing part about ‘Solving the Mystery of Dying Starfish’ is that it inspired Congressman Danny Heck to write a Bill after he had seen the footage. For me that makes the process of ’tilting at windmills’ worth doing.”

Sea star wasting syndrome is still ongoing. If you wish to be part of the research, follow this link.
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