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2017 DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominees

The DEMA Reaching Out Award was first presented in 1989. This award recognises an individual who has made a significant contribution to the sport of diving by “reaching out” in some special way to improve the sport for everyone.

Al Hornsby, Doug McNeese, DEMA Reaching Out Award 2017, scuba diving awards, PADI, SSI, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving PR.jpg

This year PADI stalwart Al Hornsby and SSI’s Doug McNeese are the recipients of the 2017 DEMA Reaching Out Award. But who else was nominated for their work in developing recreational and technical diving?

The following are the 2017 DEMA Reaching Out Award nominees.

They include environmentalists, explorers, photographers, manufacturers and educators. The names are listed in alphabetical order. Some names will be familiar to you, some less so.

Click on a name or photo to find out more about these fascinating nominees.

Mike Ball

Mike Ball, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Mike Ball Dive Expeditions, scuba diving awards, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Richard Batchelder

Richard E. Batchelder, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Ccompressed Air Supplies, scuba diving awards, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Larry Beggs

Larry Beggs, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee. Reef Innovations, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Richard Bennett

Jeffery Bozanic

Jeff Bozanic, rebreathers, technical diving, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Ernest H. Brooks

Ernest Brooks, Ernie Brooks, underwater photographer, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Jonas Brandt

Jonas Brandt, poseidon rebreathers, MKVI, SE7EN, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Buddy Brown

Buddy Brown, TDI, SDI, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Curt Brown

JD Duff

JD Duff, underwater photography, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Lynn Funkhouser

Lynn Funkhouse, underwater photography, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Jerry Greenberg

 Jerry Greenberg, underwater photography, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Mark A. Gresham

Mark Gresham, scuba cylinder testing, PSI-PCI, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Wayne R. Hasson

Wayne Hasson, Aggressor Fleet, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Lamar Hires

Lamar Hires, Dive Rite, Jill Heinerth, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Jim Hollis

Jim Hollis, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Ian G. Koblick

Ian-Koblick, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Thomas J. Koch

Thomas J. Koch, deaf scuba diving instructor, PADI, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Thomas Leaird

Thomas Leaird, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Larry McKenna

Larry McKenna, save turtles, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Martin Parker

Martin Parker, AP Diving, Inspiration Rebreather, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Mike Pelissier & Jerry Peck

Mike Pelissier, Jerry Peck, full face masks, Ocean Technology Systems, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Margo Peyton

Margo Peyton, PADI, KIds Sea Camp, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Scubapro. Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Robert Quintana

Robert Quintana, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Lee Selisky

Lee Selisky, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Dale Sheckler

Dale Sheckler, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Richard Stewart

Richard H. Stewart IV, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Barbara L. Thomson

Barbara L. Thomson, Subsea Engineering Technologies, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Paul Wagenseller

Paul Wagenseller, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Kathy A. Weydig

Kathy Weydig, Women Divers Hall of Fame, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Bruce R Wienke

Bruce R Wienke, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards,

Cristina Zenato

Cristina Zenato, Women Divers Hall of Fame, EUROTEK Diver of The Conference, shark advocate, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards, Mark Dixon

Armand & JoAnn Zigahn

Armand Zigahn, JoAnn Zigahn, Beneath The Sea Dive Show, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

 

 

 

 

 

Rebreather Divers Grateful For Henderson’s List

Gordon Henderson, CCR, Inspiration List, Martin Parker, Nicky Finn, AP Diving, Geraint Ffoulkes-Jones, Sally Cartwright, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, closed circuit rebreather safety

At the end of May 2017 AP Diving’s Managing Director – Martin Parker – issued a statement on the Inspiration List.

“Gordon Henderson is retiring his Inspiration Users List after 19 years. I don’t think this milestone should pass without acknowledging the role of Gordon’s Inspiration List for CCRs generally: It has been a fundamental part of the way the sport diving world has learned about closed circuit rebreathers, procedures and rebreather safety.”

Gordon Henderson was an early adopter of the Inspiration Rebreather and a gifted IT specialist. When he placed an order for the “just launched” Inspo in 1998, Henderson immediately recognised the need for Inspiration owners to be able to communicate freely, and set up the Inspiration List using his Drogon email system. (Social media didn’t exist at the time and forums were pretty basic).

The resulting Inspiration List provided certified AP rebreather users with immediate multi-way communication and the ability to discuss issues, and share experiences with other CCR divers because “no knowledge or a little knowledge can kill you”.

“Why we don’t use Lithium Hydroxide, …..the idea for monitoring the thermal process in the scrubber came from list member discussions, ….understanding the effect of depth on the scrubber, …best decompression practices, ….best gas choices are just some of the topics that were put to bed.”
Martin Parker

Gordon Henderson, CCR, Inspiration List, Martin Parker, Nicky Finn, AP Diving, Geraint Ffoulkes-Jones, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, closed circuit rebreather safety, Sally Cartwright, SAA Chairman, Bluebird Project

Early Inspiration adopter and wreck explorer Sally Cartwright checks her handsets

“As a new Inspo diver (15 months now), lemme [sic] register my regards and gratitude to Gordon for doing this good work. A list like this is critical to safe, independent customer development and education, and it’s good to see that the factory agrees.”
Ken Blakely

This forum has proven to be the single most valuable education tool for the both of us to learn to dive more safely and knowledgeably. Time and again real nuggets of information from many contributors have enable us to learn more about our breathers and diving in general that we would not have otherwise learned.”
M
arc & Phyllis Dennis

Martin Parker also stated that if it wasn’t for Gordon’s involvement, the Inspiration List would have been dropped.

“I realised that quite a few of the subscribers enjoy this form of communication and if there is something important for the factory to say, it’s a good way of reaching people quickly.” Martin Parker

The Inspiration List also inspired other divers to set up valuable resources, including Jan Willem Bech’s “The Rebreather Site.

We are pleased to report that Andrew Last has kindly taken up the Inspiration List mantle.

Thank you Gordon for your exceptional service. It has been appreciated by so many CCR divers.

I’ll leave the last word to wreck explorer Geraint Ffoulkes-Jones.

“The true legacy of all your excellent work just cannot be measured, because it is the number of lives your valuable Inspo and general CCR information sharing source has saved over countless years, and thankfully we will never know the true extent.”

 

 

Remembering Britannic’s Violet Jessop

100 years ago today ‘Miss Unsinkable’ – Violet Constance Jessop –  survived the sinking of HMHS Britannic.

The Last Olympian, Ken Marschall, HMHS Britannic, Richie Kohler, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, Kea Island, The Underwater Marketing Company, Lone Wolf Productions, Simon MilsJessop originally served as an ocean liner stewardess on the White Star ship RMS Olympic. At the time this was the largest luxury liner in the World.

On 20 September 2011 Jessop was on board when the Olympic sailed from Southampton. The first Olympic class liner collided with the British warship HMS Hawk. Luckily there were no fatalities and the ship made it back to port without sinking.

Just over six months later Jessop joined the crew of the second Olympic class liner on her maiden voyage: RMS Titanic. The loss of this supposedly ‘unsinkable’ ship during the early hours of 15 April 1912 had a huge impact on the owners of the White Star line and the British maritime industry. Harland and Wolff – the Belfast shipbuilder – quickly adopted a ‘safety-first’ approach, and amended the design of their third Olympic class liner.

The Last Olympian, HMHS Britannic, Ken Marschall, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Violet Jessop

Ken Marschall is a respected maritime painter | http://www.kenmarschall.com

Britannic was born at the wrong time because she was launched on 26 February 1914 – five months before the outbreak of WWI. She therefore did not see service as a transatlantic passenger liner. Instead the British Government requisitioned the last Olympian, refitted her and repainted her. Her hull was painted white complete with large red crosses. Britannic’s role was to carry sick and injured troops home from Gallipoli. Violet Jessop joined the crew as a nurse.

On 21st November 1969 Britannic was steaming along the Kea Channel in Greece. At approximately 08.12 a violent explosion rocked the ship. The ship had hit a German mine. Despite Harland and Wolff’s major modifications, Britannic sunk within 57 minutes.

“The white pride of the ocean’s medical world … dipped her head a little, then a little lower and still lower. All the deck machinery fell into the sea like a child’s toys. Then she took a fearful plunge, her stern rearing hundreds of feet into the air until with a final roar, she disappeared into the depths.” Violet Jessop

In September 2006 I joined a HMHS Britannic expedition led by Richie Kohler and John Chatterton. During the expedition I was asked to play the role of Violet Jessop for a re-enactment.

The Last Olympian, HMHS Britannic, Richie Kohler, John Chatterton, Martin Parker, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Evan Kovacs, rebreathers, Simon Mills

The 2006 HMHS Britannic Dive Team

We filmed the sequence on Sunday 24th September 2006 in Kea Harbour. The cinematographer was Evan Kovacs and the safety diver was Joe Porter, editor of Wreck Diving Magazine.

It was already a hot afternoon before I donned woollen stockings, a long dress, a big black woollen coat, long scarf and hat. The ensemble was topped off by a very bulky cork life jacket.

We quickly realised that the life jacket worked. A good thing you would think. However I had to be pulled underneath the surface to re-create the struggle that Jessop had gone through to survive the sinking. The solution. I wore my 20lb shot belt beneath the long dress.

Jumping into Kea Harbour was a blessed relief from the intense Greek sun. But the respite was short lived. Film work tends to be a lot of ‘hurry up and wait’ interspersed with some intense action. There was a lot of hanging around in the water, and I began to get cold.

And it was literally hanging around for me.  I had to hold onto something solid for surface support as my weight belt proved to be most effective at pulling me under water.

Petar Denoble, HMHS Britannic, Violet Jessop, Titanic, Simon Mills, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, Richie Kohler, The Last Olympian, The Underwater Marketing Company, Lone Wolf Productions,

Filming in Kea Harbour | Photo Credit: Petar Denoble

This particular shoot took at least a couple of hours – I was filmed from all angles performing a variety of moves such as my feet kicking in the blue water. I was also shot from topside and underwater being pulled beneath Kea Harbour.

Evan asked that I jump into the water a number of times. He wanted to film me from below the surface as I replicated Jessop leaping out of the lifeboat and into the Aegean Sea.

“To my horror, I saw Britannic’s huge propellers churning and mincing up everything near them – men, boats and everything were just one ghastly whirl.” Violet Jessop

The lifeboat that Violet Jessop was in was being pulled into Britannic’s still rotating propellor. The only way to survive this giant mincing machine was to jump from the lifeboat. In doing so Violet struck her head on the keel and suffered a fractured skull.

All in all it was a great experience working with Evan and Joe on this shoot. When it was complete I climbed out of Kea Harbour with new respect for Violet Jessop. She must have been a remarkable lady.

Footnote

There have been a number of documentaries and books about HMHS Britannic. The latest book – ‘Mystery of the Last Olympian‘ – has been co-authored by Richie Kohler. Richie has dived this Olympic class liner in 2006, 2009, 2015 and 2016. He answers the century-old question as to why all the engineering solutions built into the mighty Britannic could not save her from sharing the same fate as Titanic.

John Dalla-Zuanna Receives OZTek 2015 Outstanding Achievement Award

OZTek 2015 Technical Diver of the Year, OZTek 2015 Industry Recognition Award, OZTek 2015 Outstanding Achievement Award, OZTek 2015 Media Excellence Award, John Dalla-Zuanna, Richard Vevers, Richard Evans, Lance Robb. OZTek 2015 Award Winners, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, The OZTek Awards celebrate the achievements and endeavours of Australia’s leading Divers and Dive Industry personnel – the people who have helped push the boundaries of knowledge and exploration in the field of advanced and technical diving.

On Sunday 15th March 2015, during the Gala Award Ceremony, previous OZTEk award winner Dr Richard ‘Harry’ Harris announced OZTek’s 2015 Outstanding Achievement Award. This is what Harry had to say to packed audience of advanced and technical diving movers and shakers.

“It is an enormous honour to be asked by the OZTek Organisers to present this very well deserved award to a close friend, a wonderful dive budy, a mentor and a constant voice of reason in the mad world of technical diving!

I would like to break with tradition and ask this man – John Dalla-Zuanna – to come and join me up here, whilst I tell you why he is such a special guy in this great sport of ours.

At the cheeky young age of just 58, JDZ is truly a veteran of the sport of cave and technical diving. Cave diving in Australia started pretty much at the time JDZ started cave diving, so it is impossible to consider one without the other. Around the time the CDAA became incorporated in 1973, JDZ started visiting the Mount Gambier area. He cut a fine figure in Piccaninnie Ponds with his Moray suit! He became qualified in 1975 as member #256 and from that time on was inspired by the sport. A trip in the late 70’s to Florida to meet Sheck Exlley, Wes Skiles and Woody Jasper quickly led to adopting sidemount diving, and feeling the thrill of laying line in virgin passage.

OZTek 2015 Harry Harris and JOhn Dalla Zuanna by Rosemary E Lunn

Dr ‘Harry’ Harris introducing cave diver John Dalla-Zuanna at the 2015 OZTek Award Dinner Photo Credit: Rosemary E Lunn / The Underwater Marketing Company

Thus the passion was born and returned to Australia and began teaching both open water and cave diving. He has reached the highest levels of recreational and cave diving instructor. And, as a long time FAUI instructor, a PADI Course Director and CDAA Advanced Cave instructor, countless students have come under his thoughtful and methodical influence. The CDAA has benefited enormously from John’s vision for cave diving, and he has filled a voluntary position with that organisation in some form or another almost continuously. Ken Smith always said that he used to think cave diving politics were a matter of life and death, and now he realises it is much more serious! JDZ has been a calming influence on all factions of the CDAA for many yearss and is unique in that he is respected and heard by all sides.

OZTek 2015, cave diving explorer, Paul Hosie, Craig Challen, Ken Smith, Wetmules, John Dalla-Zuanna, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, technical diving, scuba diving, The Underwater Marketing Company

Cave diving explorer Paul Hosie @ OZTek.15 Photo Credit: Rosemary E Lunn

I met John at OZTek in, I think, 2003. We had been exchanging emails for awhile and I was about to leave to live in Vanuatu. John had built a rebreather heads up display from an LED light and a mobile phone vibrating motor! He generously gave me this device to put onto my KISS rebreather, which considerably enhanced the safety of my cave exploration at the the time.

After my stint in Vanuatu JDZ was one of the instructors on my penetration course and we struck up a real friendship underscored by our passion for caves, rebreathers and exploration. John had dived in so many caves around the world and along with guys like Paul Hosie, Craig Challen and Ken Smith, I quickly found a group of experienced cave divers who mentored me into the world of exploration and expedition diving. I am sure John has had a major impact on many other peoples’ lives, the way he has influenced mine.

JDZ’s ingenuity goes way back. He built a radio detection device called ‘the Thumper’ which played no small part in the mapping of Mount Gambier’s showpiece, ‘Tank Cave’. John was an early adopter of closed circuit rebreathers, and along with Tubby McKenzie the early leaky valve CCR Dolphin was born and dived to 85 metres on the Bayonet in the ships graveyard in Victoria. It was this creation that caught my eye and got me into rebreathers in 2002.

John the inventor became an indispensable part of the Wetmules team. (Moto: Lurching from crisis to crisis). His lithium scooter batteries propelled Craig Challen and I to the end of Cocklebiddy in 2008, where Craig added new line to the end of the cave. They also now famously caused the fire which burnt my car to the ground on the way home! His early 12 volt heated undergarments kept us warm in the Pearse Resurgence and his wonderful pasta kept us fed.

OZTek 2015. Dr Harry Harris, battery fire, Cocklebiddy Cave Exploration, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Dr ‘Harry’ Harris contemplating the fact that his beloved Mk15.5 rebreather was now a blackened blob inside the burnt out shell of his Nissan Patrol. (Along with all his other diving equipment, camera system, camping equipment, laptop and clothing). Harry was his way home from a two week cave diving trip to Australia’s famous Cocklebiddy Cave in summer 2008, when he spotted smoke in the rear view mirror. 10 minutes after pulling over, everything was destroyed by fire.

John is a regular ocean and wreck diver. He has numerous sub 100 metre / 328 feet wreck dives to his credit and continues to teach young divers open water diving through the La Trobe university club, sharing his passion for all things aquatic. His huge passion right now is the 3D mapping of cave using a combination of video and gaming technology, and in this area he is becoming a world leader. I hope many of you got to see his talk on this today. As the current Site Director of CDAA he shows no sign of letting up, and I look foward to sharing many more dives with this wonderful friend and great ambassador for the sport of technical diving.

2015 OZTek Speakers, Heather Hamza, Alberto Nava, Richard Nicholls, Jayne Jenkins, Richard Taylor, Paul Raymaekers, Ben Reymenants, Liz Rogers, Dave Ross, Ken Smith, Lance Robb, Martin Parker, Simon Pridmore, Sue Crowe, Rod Macdonald, Daren Marshall, Barry McGill, Pete Mesley, Rosemary E Lunn, Simon Mitchell, David Strike, Dr Catherine Meehan, Michael Menduno, Richard 'Harry' Harris, Lamar Hires, Paul Hosie, Deborah Johnston, Richard Lundgren, Heather Hamza, Liam Allen, Michael Aw, Peter Buzzacott, Matt Carter, Steve Cox, John Dalla-Zuanna, John Garvin, Laura James, Paul Haynes, Paul Toomer,

The 2015 OZTek Speakers

John Dalla-Zuanna, please accept this Outstanding Achievement Award for your long standing contributions to cave and technical diving.”

 

buzzoole code

Rebreather Cell Warning Advice by Mike Fowler, Silent Diving

At some point in your CCR diving career you are likely to encounter a cell warning. Besides pressing the right button to make it go quiet, do you really know what to look for or do about it?

Cell warnings are given by AP rebreathers when one cell deviates from the average of the closest two by more than 0.2 bar. It is the machine’s way of telling you that all is not well and you need to check it out. It might be just that one cell is reacting slower than its partners or may be something very serious indeed.

The important point is that YOU need to check it. Just assuming the machine will take care of you and suppressing the warning is extremely dangerous. Understanding how the machine works is a valuable tool in your armory. It might seem obvious but it is always worth remembering that when diluent is added to the loop you expect the PO2 to fall, and when oxygen is added you expect the PO2 to rise.

Ambient Pressure Diving, Martin Parker, Silent Diving, Mike Fowler, rebreather cell warnings, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, diving safety, Evolution, Vision electronics

 

With the Vision electronics you can do all sorts of diagnostics that can help you to decide on the correct course of action in the water but also after the dive the download allows you (and the factory or Silent Diving) to diagnose what happened.

A diluent flush is seen as a great method of checking cells and at the same time ensures you have a life supporting gas mixture in the loop, but from observing divers and downloads it is clear that very few do a diluent flush effectively enough to check cells. You must watch the display as you are doing to flush. The problem often arises from the fact that as soon as the PO2 goes below the setpoint the machine adds oxygen, what’s happening is you are trying to lower the PO2 at the same time as the machine is trying to raise it. The simple answer is; change to the low setpoint (by pressing and holding the middle button, regardless of whether you use Manual, Auto or Gradual setpoint change methods) and then do the diluent flush for 5 – 10 secs.

Providing you are using an appropriate diluent for the dive, one that is not too oxygen rich and you do the diluent flush properly, the displayed PO2 should drop very rapidly to the expected value for that diluent at that depth. The expected PO2 is easy enough to calculate if you measure depth in meters, but not quite so straight forward if you measure depth in feet. You just need to go into Menu mode, by pressing the outside two buttons and scrolling through until you get to the PO2 screen where it shows you the expected PO2 at this depth should you flush with diluent or oxygen.

You are looking for the reaction speed of the cells, do they fall at roughly the same speed and do they reach the expected value? If for instance, only cell 1 hits the expected value, then when you change back to the high setpoint that cell is most likely to be the accurate cell at the high setpoint. As oxygen is added watch the cell displays to see if they rise at roughly the same speed and do they get to setpoint?

APD Handset, Ambient Pressure Diving, Silent Diving, Matthew Outram, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Image by Matthew Outram

 

Cell warnings can occur for a number of reasons, it might be that one cell simply reacts slightly slower to a gas change, but more importantly it could be letting you know that the machine’s voting logic is no longer a valid way to keep you alive.

When this happens don’t blindly continue thinking the same as the machine, believing the closest two are accurate.

A diluent flush may be all that you need to do to get rid of the cell warning but a persistent cell warning is telling you that the voting logic is not going to work, and it’s your job to find out which cells are giving the correct values. Just because the machine thinks the nearest two are correct doesn’t mean they actually are, and then once you find out which cell or cells is / are correct, then you can fly it manually.

Once you start seeing two low cells and one 0.2+ bar higher, it would be prudent to lower the setpoint. This would potentially lower the setpoint below the two current limited cells’ outputs, allowing them to work properly again and if successful, lower the high output cell bringing it within the safe PO2 envelope.

You might be thinking this is too much hassle but remember a diluent flush is easy and quick to do and it puts breathable life supporting gas into your rebreather for most of your dives at most depths. Obviously if you are shallow with a hypoxic Trimix, then you would have to do the cell check with an oxygen flush, but with that proviso, it is good practice.

Ambient Pressure Diving support the race to the bottom of the Mariana Trench

We know less about the deepest points on our planet than we do about the surface of Mars. This could all change quite soon because Richard Branson in Oceanic / Deep Flight Explorer and James Cameron in Deepsea Challenge are currently racing to the lowest point in the Mariana Trench; the Challenger Deep. This lies 6.83 miles below the ocean and it’s the first extensive scientific exploration in a manned submersible of the deepest spot on Earth.

Two rebreather manufacturers have been quietly involved with this project. Branson has embraced the Poseidon Mark VI as his bailout, whilst Cameron is using Ambient Pressure Diving’s technology for life support within the submarine.

James Cameron, Ambient Pressure Diving, APD, rebreather, Deepsea Challenge, Mariana Trench, Richard Branson, Poseidon Poseidon Mark VI, exploration, deep sea diving“Up until today we’ve had to keep schtum about our involvement on this project”, stated Martin Parker.  “We’re aware that Cameron has just finished Deep trials in the New Britain Trench.  The Deep Sea Challenge Team have spent the last four weeks off the Coasts of Papua New Guinea and New Britain mounting a series of increasingly deeper dives to prepare for James Cameron’s dive to the bottom of the Marina Trench. Surpassing 8,000 metres (actual depth 8,221 metres) for several hours James Cameron is the deepest solo submarine pilot and is in the deepest operational submarine”.

Ambient Pressure Diving is responsible for keeping the pilot alive in the submarine – not a small role.

“Our job was to design and manufacturer the complete automatic life support system in the submarine. This includes the primary system and an identical back up system which can be used in a closed circuit mode in an emergency. As you’d expect the life support technology is running smoothly, removing the CO2 and controlling the PO2 in a similar way to the way we do in our standard rebreathers. The main scrubber system is fan driven, powered from the sub…should that power be lost then the pilot can move to the bailout rebreather. In total he’s got about 70 hours of life support depending on his work rate. The data is stored on board the Vision system but we also send it live to the on board PAC from where it is transmitted to the surface every 3 mins.

I am very proud to be part of the build team, and exceedingly proud of our in-house engineers and development team here in HelstonAmbient Pressure Diving, Martin Parker, Silent Diving, Rosemary E Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, rebreathers who delivered the finished system in four months, from award of contract.  The fact that we used our standard rebreather components and re-packaged them gives us a massive boost in delivery capability and most importantly reliability.

We are in daily contact with the ship, receiving dive download data for cross-checking so that we can support the team out there with advice….these are truly exciting times.”

Follow this link and if you look hard enough inside the sub you’ll see APD’s logo.

David Parker of AP Valves

We regret to announce that David Parker, Company Chairman and co-founder of AP has died.

He helped shape British diving over four decades, initially inventing and then manufacturing the AP Valve (the Angela Parker Valve).  This very simple and reliable breathing valve allowed divers to breathe the emergency air carried in the small ABLJ bottles fitted to the Fenzy and later the Buddy jackets.  Whilst it seems impossible to imagine now because almost every diver carries an alternative air source, ie an Octopus, this wasn’t always the case. When the AP Valve was invented alternative air sources were just a pipe dream, hence this valve was much valued because it was an effective way of getting air to breathe in those first critical moments of an “out of air situation”.

In 1972 David created the first Buddy buoyancy jacket and it was one of the first manufactured with a direct feed low pressure inflator.  Two years later in 1974 David again was an innovator producing polyurethane HF welded buoyancy jackets – the only sensible production technique that is used today for all BCs and Counterlungs.

He also invented the self-sealing surface marker buoy and was running the company when the Buddy Pacific, Arctic, Sea King, and Commando jackets were developed and first sold.

David Parker was a founding member of the North Warwicks Sub Aqua Club and was BSAC Instructor No.177.

In 2007, he was awarded a much deserved Lifetime Achievement Award by Diver Magazine for his lasting contribution to the diving industry. As of today’s date, the only lifetime achievement award they have made.

He leaves behind an incredible legacy in the shape of AP Valves and Ambient Pressure Diving.