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Posts Tagged ‘Global Underwater Explorers’

Book your space on the GUE Swanage ‘Experience Day’

John Kendall, Global Underwater Explorers, GUE, José Francisco Duarte, Swanage, scuba diving Dorset, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving news

GUE UK are holding an ‘Experience Day’ in Swanage.

If you have heard about GUE and not sure whether it’s for you or not, or you are just curious to know more about GUE, then head to Dorset on Saturday 28th July 2018.

You’ll have the opportunity for a bit of “me time” to work on some dive skills that may have become rusty.

You will also be able to chat with GUE instructors and dives about training, courses and exciting projects.

Spaces are limited and cost £25 per head, so please contact John Kendall to secure your space, or get your questions answered.

Ghost Fishing Comes To EUROTEK.2016

Pascal van Erp, EUROTEK, ghost fishing, healthy seas, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, OceanPositive, Fourth Element, recycling fishing nets, recycled clothing

Pascal van Erp

It has just been announced that ‘Ghost Fishing’ founder Pascal Van Erp is to speak at EUROTEK on 8th and 9th October 2016.

Pascal is a passionate temperate wreck diver. However much to his dismay, he often found the North Sea wrecks he was diving were covered in nets that ‘ghost fished’.

‘Ghost Fishing’ is the term given to an abandoned fishing net, snagged on reef or wreck, that continues to trap marine wildlife. The marine life eventually dies, whilst the net continues to fish. It is estimated that up to 640,000 tonnes of nylon fishing gear lurks beneath the ocean, and more is added daily.

One day on a dive, Pascal recovered some net. It changed the ethos of his diving – from being an ardent wreck diver to a passionate environmental diver. He was soon heading up a team of divers actively recovering discarded and trapped nets from Netherlands waters. The ‘Ghost Fishing Foundation‘ was born.

Ghost fishing, Pascal van Erp, Heather Hamza, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, EUROTEK speakerToday a number of divers from Global Underwater Explorers are involved around the world (Germany, Greece, Pakistan, Spain, USA) with this dangerous, demanding and hazardous pursuit. And it has even come to the UK! Last year Pascal lead a team of Brits to recover ghost fishing nets in Scapa Flow.

You might think the story would finish there, but that would be to underestimate this tall quiet Dutchman. Pascal wanted a suitable solution. The answer was to recycle the recovered fishing gear into usable, knittable ECONYL® nylon yarn.

Enter stage left EUROTEK co-founder Rosemary E Lunn. She heard Pascal speak about the Ghost Fishing Project and thought the new fabric fascinating and something that divers would want to wear. She briefed Fourth Element about the project knowing that this Cornish company is heavily environmentally focused. In 2014 Fourth Element fully closed the loop on the recycling circle, by launching their ‘grave-to-cradle’ ‘OceanPositive‘ range of water-wear garments.

Pascal Van Erp is going reveal the latest projects the Ghost Fishing Foundation have been involved in at EUROTEK.2016. Tickets for this advanced diving conference are selling quickly. To secure your pass click here.

 

 

GUE Offers Dryruns At Boot

GUE, Boot Show, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Rich Walker, Yvonne Pietz

Just how slick are your ‘dry runs’? Global Underwater Explorers (GUE) is inviting every diver that attends the Dusseldorf based Boot Show the chance to gain some free training and improve their techniques. It doesn’t matter what experience you have (sport recreational diver or a technical diver) or what equipment configuration you dive (standard BCD or backplate and harness system).

GUE ‘dry run’ field drills include;

  1. How to tie boltsnaps
  2. The S-Drill – safety / gas sharing drill
  3. How to make a safe gas-switch
  4. Isolation manifolds – how they work and how to do a valve drill
  5. Setting up a back-plate and harness
  6. How to configure your suit inflate system
  7. How to assemble your regulator and hoses
  8. How to deploy a surface Marker Buoy

Click here to sign up for your voucher and your free Dry-run!

This is also a great opportunity to discuss skills and drills, get equipment advice, share your passion for the underwater realm, or plan an underwater session with an instructor at a GUE Experience Day later in the year. You can also check out various presentations on the TauchTurm or watch pool demonstrations.

This German based show kicks off on Saturday 17th January and the show is open until Sunday 25th January. You can find GUE in Hall 3, Booth E06, located next to Beyond The Shore (BTS), Halcyon and DUI.

New Guidelines For Divers In England

This guidance for divers in England is issued today (Monday 7th April 2014) by the following agencies as a joint statement: BSAC, GUE, PADI, PSAI, SSI, SAA and TDI / SDI.

Marine Management logo_BSAC_GUE_PADI_PSAI_SAA_SDI_SSI_TDI_Rosemary E Lunn_Roz Lunn_The Underwater Marketing Company_MMOBSAC, acting as the National Governing Body for Scuba diving and working with SAA and PADI, has been negotiating on behalf of all divers and diver training agencies with the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) with respect to the interpretation of the legal requirements for divers under the Marine and Coastal Access Act 2009 (MCAA).

After lengthy consultation, a set of guidelines for all divers diving in English waters has now been agreed.  These guidelines enable divers to go about their standard normal diving and training activities without a requirement for a licence and divers can use the guidelines to ensure that they remain within the law.

Activities that do not require a licence include:

•             Deploying and recovering temporary shot lines for divers
•             Using delayed or permanently inflated SMBs
•             Using a lifting bag to recover items which have been underwater for less than 12 months
•             Conducting surveys of shipwrecks by hand
•             Using lifting bags for underwater litterpicks.

For other certain activities, the MMO still requires either prior notification or an application for a licence; the MMO can be consulted for guidance in these cases.  Similar guidance will be available in due course for Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish waters.

All diver-training agencies active in England endorse these guidelines and actively encourage their instructors, members and divers to abide by them.

For further guidance please refer to the Marine Licensing: Guidance for Recreational Divers information sheet.

For all additional queries or questions regarding these new guidelines please contact the Marine Management Organisation (MMO) direct:

Telephone 0300 123 1032 or email

This update has been issued by:

British Sub-Aqua Club (BSAC)
Global Underwater Explorers (GUE)
Professional Association of Diving Instructors (PADI)
Professional Scuba Association International (PSAI)
Scuba Schools International (SSI)
Sub Aqua Association (SAA)
Scuba Diving International; Technical Diving International (TDI / SDI)

Rich Walker Profile – X-RAY MAG’s Rosemary E. Lunn caught up with Walker to find out more about his experience and expertise.

Rich Walker is a full-time instructor with Global Underwater Explorers in the United Kingdom, but has worked for nearly 15 years at the University of Sheffield as a researcher studying how blood flows around the body. His knowledge of physiology and physics gives him a unique edge as a diving instructor.

Where did you learn to dive?
In 1990, I was a medical physicist designing electronic diagnostic equipment based at St Barts Hospital in the City of London. One day, I walked past a colleague’s office and recognised a BCD and a set of regs hanging up. I’ve always had the desire to dive right from when I was a small child. The key influence had been my parents because Mum and Dad met through scuba diving.

From a very early age, I can clearly remember gear lying around the house and playing with it in the bath. But in the 1970’s, children were not encouraged to go diving by BSAC, so it just didn’t happen.

Now was my chance to embrace all things rubber, and I asked my colleague how I could start. “Come down to the club on Tuesday night,” he said, and it went from there. I joined the Polytechnic of North London Sub Aqua Club.

I’d always been a swimmer, so to be able to be underwater and breath at the same time was just mind blowing. And when I dived in the sea and saw fish and wrecks, I was hooked. I trained up to BSAC Advanced Diver level and became an Open Water Instructor spending my weekends happily exploring the myriad of South Coast wrecks, from Swanage to Plymouth.

Then my boss dropped a bombshell. He’d been given funding to move him and his team up north, and I had a choice whether to continue with my PhD or not. I was two years into modelling the Femoral Artery, and with two years work to go, Sheffield seemed the right move.

As I was still technically a student, I joined the Sheffield University Sub Aqua Club and served time as their Diving Officer and their Advanced Training Officer. It was whilst I was at Sheffield that I got introduced to Scottish diving.

My first trip was to Lochaline and the Sound of Mull. It’s fair to say that it blew me away. I couldn’t believe that there was all this diving completely neglected by South Coast divers. The life was more prolific, the wrecks were in better shape, easier to get to and the Sound of Mull was far more sheltered than the South Coast. For five years, I pretty much dived Oban and Lochaline solidly with an odd trip to Ullapool and Scapa Flow thrown in for good measure.

And then I dived out of Aberdeen. One of the women in the dive club came from Aberdeen, so we stayed at her house for a weekend, and we hit the East Coast. You know how some dives are forever etched on your soul? Well, what I remember was being astounded by the incredible viz coupled with big, big wrecks and seriously large animals. It was my first experience of Wolf Fish, and they were everywhere. And then, you got the usual marine life, but it was supersized. When I eventually dived Norway, it reminded me vividly of diving Aberdeen.
 
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