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2017 DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominees

The DEMA Reaching Out Award was first presented in 1989. This award recognises an individual who has made a significant contribution to the sport of diving by “reaching out” in some special way to improve the sport for everyone.

Al Hornsby, Doug McNeese, DEMA Reaching Out Award 2017, scuba diving awards, PADI, SSI, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving PR.jpg

This year PADI stalwart Al Hornsby and SSI’s Doug McNeese are the recipients of the 2017 DEMA Reaching Out Award. But who else was nominated for their work in developing recreational and technical diving?

The following are the 2017 DEMA Reaching Out Award nominees.

They include environmentalists, explorers, photographers, manufacturers and educators. The names are listed in alphabetical order. Some names will be familiar to you, some less so.

Click on a name or photo to find out more about these fascinating nominees.

Mike Ball

Mike Ball, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Mike Ball Dive Expeditions, scuba diving awards, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Richard Batchelder

Richard E. Batchelder, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Ccompressed Air Supplies, scuba diving awards, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Larry Beggs

Larry Beggs, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee. Reef Innovations, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Richard Bennett

Jeffery Bozanic

Jeff Bozanic, rebreathers, technical diving, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Ernest H. Brooks

Ernest Brooks, Ernie Brooks, underwater photographer, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Jonas Brandt

Jonas Brandt, poseidon rebreathers, MKVI, SE7EN, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Buddy Brown

Buddy Brown, TDI, SDI, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Curt Brown

JD Duff

JD Duff, underwater photography, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Lynn Funkhouser

Lynn Funkhouse, underwater photography, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Jerry Greenberg

 Jerry Greenberg, underwater photography, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Mark A. Gresham

Mark Gresham, scuba cylinder testing, PSI-PCI, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Wayne R. Hasson

Wayne Hasson, Aggressor Fleet, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Lamar Hires

Lamar Hires, Dive Rite, Jill Heinerth, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Jim Hollis

Jim Hollis, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Ian G. Koblick

Ian-Koblick, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Thomas J. Koch

Thomas J. Koch, deaf scuba diving instructor, PADI, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Thomas Leaird

Thomas Leaird, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Larry McKenna

Larry McKenna, save turtles, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Martin Parker

Martin Parker, AP Diving, Inspiration Rebreather, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Mike Pelissier & Jerry Peck

Mike Pelissier, Jerry Peck, full face masks, Ocean Technology Systems, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Margo Peyton

Margo Peyton, PADI, KIds Sea Camp, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Scubapro. Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Robert Quintana

Robert Quintana, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Lee Selisky

Lee Selisky, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Dale Sheckler

Dale Sheckler, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Richard Stewart

Richard H. Stewart IV, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Barbara L. Thomson

Barbara L. Thomson, Subsea Engineering Technologies, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Paul Wagenseller

Paul Wagenseller, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Kathy A. Weydig

Kathy Weydig, Women Divers Hall of Fame, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

Bruce R Wienke

Bruce R Wienke, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards,

Cristina Zenato

Cristina Zenato, Women Divers Hall of Fame, EUROTEK Diver of The Conference, shark advocate, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards, Mark Dixon

Armand & JoAnn Zigahn

Armand Zigahn, JoAnn Zigahn, Beneath The Sea Dive Show, DEMA Reaching Out Award Nominee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving awards

 

 

 

 

 

The Verdict Is In: Skiles -v- Lamartek

Wesley Skiles, Lamar Hires, Lamartek, Dive Rite, O2ptima rebreather, National Geographic, cave photographer, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Photo Credit: Brian Carney, TDI

 

On 21st July 2010 renowned underwater photographer Wesley (Wes) Skiles died during a photo shoot off Boynton Beach, Florida. He had been shooting footage of Goliath Grouper for National Geographic. At the time Wes was diving an O2ptima rebreather.

Two weeks ago Terri Skiles, Wes’ widow, asked a Palm Beach County jury to award her at least US$25 million in damages from Dive Rite.

The jury has just returned their Verdict Form (Friday 20th May 2016).

We, the jury, return the following verdict:

Was there negligence on the part of LAMARTEK, INC., which was the legal cause of injury or death to WESLEY SKILES? NO

Did LAMARTEK, INC., place a rebreather on the market with a defect which was a legal cause of injury or death to WESLEY SKILES? NO

Did LAMARTEK, INC., fail to warn WESLEY SKILES of a dangerous defect that was a legal cause of injury or death to WESLEY SKILES? NO

Dive Rite has won this lawsuit. They were successfully defended by David Concannon.

Award Winning Diving Stars Speaking In Chicago Today

Jill Heinerth, Dr Neal W Pollock, Our World Underwater Chicago, Bell Island Expedition, Steve Lewis, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Rebreather Forum 3, cave diving, scuba diving

Jill Heinerth and Neal Pollock during the 2016 Bell Island Expedition – Photo Credit : Steve Lewis

Two explorers and a diving doctor are headlining ‘Our World Underwater’ in Chicago this weekend.

You can find Jill Heinerth, Richie Kohler and Dr Neal Pollock at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center, Rosemont.

Jill and Neal have just flown in from Newfoundland – they were part of a team exploring and surveying the Bell Island Mine – and are pictured here in Conception Bay South.

They are going to be talking on subjects close to their heart.

Jill is speaking about the science of cave diving and giving advice on rebreather diving, whilst Neal will be discussing managing decompression stress and concerns of the aging diver. You can find the talk schedule here.

Dive Rite, Lamar Hires, Jared Hires, Our World Underwater Chicago, Transpac, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba divingIn between talks visitors have the opportunity of perusing the very latest in scuba diving equipment. Whether you are looking for your first snorkel or first rebreather, you should be able to find it here.

If you are considering more adventurous diving it is worth checking out Dive Rite. This company extensively designs and tests their gear by taking it real life diving. In reality it means that you benefit from equipment that fits properly and is capable of supporting the dives you want to do.

Did you know that several rebreather divers use a Transpac harness underneath their unit because it is so comfortable and hard wearing? And that many divers are diving Dive Rite products that are 10 – 20 years old because they are durable and so well made?

Last Olympian, Our World Underwater Chicago, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Richie Kohler, Rebreather Forum 3, O'Three Drysuits, scuba diving, wreck divingDive Rite equipment would not be out of place being dived on *HMHS Britannic.

Britannic is **RMS Titanic’s bigger sister, and she also sunk. But why did she sink?

Britannic was being built in Belfast when Titanic sunk early on the 15th April 1912. Titanic’s catastrophic loss was such a shock to her shipbuilder – Harland & Wolff – that the engineers redesigned the mighty Britannic so that she would not share the same fate as her sister. But she sank twice as quickly as Titanic. How was that possible?

A man with some answers is wreck explorer and deep sea detective Richie Kohler. Richie is going to be talking about ‘A Decade of Exploration on HMHS Britannic’. And, if you are lucky, you might even be able to get your paws on a copy of his latest book, ‘The Last Olympian’. Why not get it signed!

*   HMHS = His / Her Majesty’s Hospital Ship
** RMS = Royal Mail Ship (sometimes Steam-ship or Steamer)

Dive Rite Cuts The Cable With Their LX20 Handheld Light

Dive Rite, LX20, scuba diving light, handheld torch, Lamar Hires, Jared Hires, Lee Ann Hires, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Lithium Ion rechargeable battery, LUX, QRM, quick release mount, burn time, rebreather diving,

Dive Rite, the Floridian leading technical diving equipment manufacturer, has augmented their lighting range with the launch of the LX20. This handheld primary light has been created to suit any diver; be they entry level, an experienced recreational diver, a cave or a technical diver.

Divers tend to build a relationship with their equipment and it can sometimes be quite sad when you hang up something for the last time because your diving needs have outgrown it. Dive Rite has recognised this trend and developed a primary torch that will match its owners experience through out their diving career.
Dive Rite, equipment for serious divers, sidemount system, Lamar Hires, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving, rebreather diving

The LX20 is compact and light, weighting in at a mere 0.56 kg, making it the perfect size to dive either handheld, on mounted on the hand using Dive Rite’s QRM (quick release mount) soft hand mount. And it seems this light easily outshines most corded primary lights on the market today because the LX20 delivers 20,000 LUX via an impressive  6° concentrated light beam for 4 hours on high power.

This little light has a depth rating of 500 ft / 152 m. And it has been designed to withstand the rigours of diving. The rotary magnetic on/off switch and a double o-ring seal body provides proven protection against flooding.

In summary it looks as though the LX20 is a versatile primary diving light with a good burn time -small in size and big on brightness.

 

With 23 Years Of Hindsight – Rigging Options For Diving

A recent post on a diving forum stated “sidemounting is just a fad”.

New(er) divers to the sport could be forgiven for thinking this style of scuba diving is a recent phenomenon.

Cave Photography, Gavin Newman, Mike Thomas, Cave Diving Group, CDG 50th Anniversary, Wookey Hole, Drager Dolphin rebreather, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Two Brit Cave Divers marking the CDG’s 50th Anniversary by diving Wookey Hole, June 1996 Photo Credit: Gavin Newman

Sidemounting was actually invented in the 1960s by the Brits. They were exploring sites such as Wookey Hole, Swildons Cave and other underground systems, and would often find ‘the way on’ was blocked by a submerged passageway called a sump. In order to explore further, these sumps needed to be navigated.

British sumps tend to be short, cramped, flooded passageways, therefore buoyancy is not an issue nor is the use of fins. Cavers just needed a means to be able to breath and (sometimes) see where they were pushing. The caver would attach a cylinder and regulator to their body using a robust belt that allowed the cylinder to be worn against the body. This ‘English system’ of cylinder rigging allowed the explorer to crawl through both dry and wet sections of cave and keep on pushing the system.

During the 1970s the ‘English system’ was adopted across the pond by Floridian cave divers. These cave systems tended to be properly flooded with the emphasis on diving to explore the cave. Buoyancy, trim and propulsion became an issue, hence cylinders were moved from the waist / thigh area, up towards the armpit and against the torso.  Once again, these divers made their own rigging system. However it wasn’t until the mid 1990s that the first commercial sidemount diving system was manufactured by Dive Rite. This was designed by Lamar Hires, a renowned cave explorer and instructor. 

The following article by Michael Menduno is reprinted from the pioneering American journal for technical diving, aquaCORPS, V4, MIX, January-February 1992.

Though double (twinset) tanks and stage bottles are generally a requirement for most technical diving operations, diving sets vary significantly depending on the specific application and diving environment. Here’s a look at some of the more common methods of set rigging as practiced today in the “doubles community.”

Squeezing By – authored by Lamar Hires

Lamar Hires, Jared Hires, Lee Ann Hires, Bob Janowski, Michael Menduno, aquaCORPS Magazine, Dive Rite, sidemount diving, technical diving, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, XRay Magazine

A Floridian sidemount rig from the early 1990’s, before Dive Rite released their TransPac system Image Credit: Bob Janowski

Originally developed for the tight low visibility sump diving that is common in Europe, sidemounts allowed spelunkers to more easily transport single cylinders through a dry cave to the dive site. In North Florida, the use of sidemount techniques has allowed exploration into small silty areas that were once thought impassable and has opened up entire new cave systems that were simply inaccessible with back mounted doubles.

Sidemounts reduce the strain of carrying heavy doubles up steep inclines, lowering cylinders down into a hole, and making those long walks through the woods to the dive site. Cave systems known to be silty can now be penetrated without heavy silting. Sidemount configuration means wearing the cylinders on the hips instead of the back. The cylinders are fastened in the middle with a snap to a harness at the waist. The necks are clipped off at the armpit using bungee material (a bicycle inner tube is preferred) so that the cylinders are forced to lay parallel to the diver’s body. Adjustments are usually needed at first to insure a snug comfortable fit.

When diving with sidemounts, gas supplies must be balanced for adequate reserves throughout the dive. The regulator and SPG hoses no longer lay across the back and instead are clipped across the chest area. The management of these is critical for proper monitoring of gas supplies and switching regulators during the dive. Back-up and emergency equipment must be streamlined and tucked away to achieve the desired profile—no thicker than two cylinders that lay along the diver’s hips.

Clearly, sidemount diving is not for everyone because of the potential hazards that exist; low visibility, line traps and squeezes that seem to get smaller and smaller are only a few of the obstacles to be overcome. A diver must be totally comfortable in all these conditions before considering sidemount as an alternative. Suitably equipped, divers who are, can usually find a way to squeeze by.

China Cult – authored by Billy Deans 

Billy Deans, Joel Silverstein, Michael Menduno, aquaCORPS Magazine, SS Andrea Doria, Poseidon, doubles, twinset, technical diving, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, XRay Magazine,

Technical diving pioneer and educator Billy Deans Image Credit: Joel Silverstein

Previously isolated from the underground and fellow wreckers to the south, the east coast wreck diving community evolved its own style of set rigging suitable for the cold dark waters of the north and the available technology. Still seen on the boats that work the Doria, Texas Tower, the Virginia and the San Diego, a typical east coast wreck diving set consists of a pair of double 80s or 95s (10.5 or 11.5 liter) or secured to a large capacity BCD jacket with a manifold system, or commonly two independent regulators, which are rotated throughout the dive.

A 40cf (5.5 liter) pony mounted between the doubles serves as a bailout, along with a handmade upreel (hemp rope wrapped around a forearm-length aluminum spindle). For the most part, stage bottles, typically air, are something divers leave tied off to the anchor line at 10ft (3m), and oxygen for decompression is still used sparingly, if at all.

Now with the advent of larger tanks, harness and manifold systems, improved decompression methods and mix technology, all that is changing. Today, a well-outfitted high tech wreck diver carries a pair of cold-filled Genesis 120s (14.5 liter) with DIN crossover manifold and valve protectors, shoulder mounted stage bottles, or ‘wing tanks’, containing decompression gas (EAN and or oxygen)—do you really want to bet your tissues on that cylinder clipped off to the anchor line? Harness, bag and back plate system, argon inflation system and of course an upreel.

The result? Wreck divers are staying down longer, getting more of that first class china, and most importantly are doing it safer. After all, when you come right down to it, the most valuable artifact that you’ll ever bring home is yourself.

To read the full article, click here

First Published: X-Ray MagazineMay 2015 Issue 66, Page 78

Wanted! A Backplate As Strong As Steel, With The Weight Of Ali

It would seem that Dive Rite has the answer with the launch of their next generation backplate, the XT Lite.

Spotted at New York’s 2015 Beneath The Sea Dive Show, this eye catching backplate is manufactured from marine grade 316 stainless steel. (316 is the preferred steel for use in marine environments because it has a greater resistance to corrosion, hence surgical steel is also made from 316 grade stainless).

Dive Rite, Lamar Hires, Jared Hires, XT Lite Backplate, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, twinset, diving doubles, scuba diving, technical diving, Florida cave diving

Dive Rite has a simple solution. They have lost the excess weight, whilst ensuring the strength of the backplate is not compromised, by laser cutting a series of cut-outs from the body of the plate. The plate is then hand finished to ensure that there are no rough or jagged edges.

It is good to see that the Dive Rite has considered that divers have changing needs for their kit. The XT Lite backplate has two sets of 2 inch slots cut along the centre spine so that the plate can be dived with a single cylinder without the need of a single tank adapter. Plus a series of 3/8 inch holes and 1 inch slots have also been cut along the outer edge of the plate, thus giving the diver a plethora of choice when it comes to mounting lights, lift bags, pony bottles and other paraphernalia. And the ever useful crotch strap has not been forgotten either. There is a slot cut for that too.

As you would expect, Dive Rite have complied with the standard twinset / doubles bolt setup measurement of 11 inches between the two holes. But that is no surprise. Dive Rite introduced this measurement back in 1984 when it started manufacturing backplates. This measurement was then adopted by the tech community.

First Published: X-Ray MagazineMay 2015 Issue 66, Page 51

#TBT: Dive Rite Launches World’s First Helium Analyser

#ThrowBackThursday. Spring 2000 to be exact. Although Helium analysers are considered standard equipment by advanced and technical divers today, they were not always the norm. In fact until the turn of the century the only way to confirm the amount of Helium in your mix was to conduct a gas spectrometer test in a lab.

The game changer – a Helium analyser you could use in the field – was launched by Dive Rite at the January 2000 DEMA Show in Las Vegas.

Dive Rite, DEMA Show 2000, Rosemary E Lunn, Lamar Hires, Jared Hires,  DEMA Show, 990 Magazine, Roz Lunn,

Above you will find a scan of an article reporting this useful news in Issue 3, Volume 2 of 990 Magazine.

If you would like to read this edition of 990 in full, click here, and download your copy of this much missed and respected diving magazine.

990 Magazine, Ron Mahoney, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Dive Rite, Caving In County Clare, Rigging it Right, HMS Repulse, HMS Prince of Wales, cold water regulator test, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving, rebreather diving