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Mark Powell wins EUROTEK.2010 Publication Award


One of the features that I like on Facebook is ‘timehop’. When the system refreshes your memory of what was happening on this day in your personal history. This morning it reminded me about EUROTEK.2010 and the awards.

Eight years ago I was delighted to award Mark Powell the EUROTEK Publication Award for ‘Deco for Divers’ Mark had previously launched this book at the inaugural EUROTEK back in 2008.

I had a dig through my computer and found my speech.

“One of the nicest things about diving is that it covers many topics – you can learn about maritime history, or become a champion bug spotter of all things soft and squiggy. And the other great thing about diving is that you can never stop learning.

One good way of getting valuable and pertinent information is through the media and publications. Tonight the EUROTEK Publication Award is being given to a diving book. Diving books can cover so many aspects such as adventure and friendship, and I’m thinking of ‘Shadow Divers‘ here. Or they can cover more serious subjects.

Deco for Divers, Mark Powell, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, EUROTEK Awards, EUROTEK.2010 Publication Award, The Underwater Marketing Company One publication keeps on being talked about, praised, poured over and devoured because it has proved to be very useful for many divers.

They have said this is “the Best book a diver can buy” and “a must for all divers“. It’s also “a solid and practical guide that is well written and hard to put down“.

Another comment was “it made the theory easier to understand“. And “I have been diving for 26 years and am qualified to teach. This book has made me aware of so many aspects of diving and opened my eyes as to what goes on whilst I am underwater and surfacing again“.

So what is this useful, easy to understand and well written book?

Perhaps it might help if I added “one of the best explanation of M-Values I’ve come across” and “if you are sincerely interested in the theory behind decompression and differences between different algorithms, this IS the book to buy“.

I am delighted to announce that the EUROTEK.2010 Publication Award goes to ‘Deco for Divers: Decompression Theory and Physiology’ by Mark Powell.”

Present Ideas For Divers: Divesangha Turtle Bag

Divesangha, reusable bag, one-time-use plastic bag, CVS Pharmacy, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company. DEMA ShowAt the end of October this year I was in Orlando for the DEMA Show. A friend of mine had also flown into town for this event and we agreed to meet up and enjoy a glass of wine or two. We were both tired and thought buying a bottle and staying in was a good option. I therefore duly popped into a CVS Pharmacy that was a couple of minutes walk from my hotel.

The USA has adopted a ‘custom’ – I can find no law about carrying closed alcohol containers – that purchased alcohol has to be placed in a brown paper bag. I don’t have an issue with this, the bag can be recycled, and I was quite content to walk back to my hotel carrying the bottle in my hand. But before I could say “no plastic bag“, the shop assistant had duly placed my ‘brown paper bag wrapped wine bottle’ into a plastic bag. I asked her “why did you put this into a plastic bag“? She replied “oh, one bag not enough? Let me double bag it for you“.

The assistant was supplying what she considered to be the best customer service she could. And for that I am grateful. I was however really horrified that her mindset considered it normal that a bottle of wine needed at least one, if not two plastic bags. It felt that they were being thrown at me like confetti.

I duly thanked her and said “please use this plastic bag for another customer, I do not need to use it“. She took the bag and the immediately threw it away because it had been ‘used’ by another customer.

Divesangha, reusable bag, one-time-use plastic bag, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing CompanyOn 5th October 2015 England followed Northern Ireland (2013), Scotland (2014) and Wales’ (2011) example and started charging a 5p levy for a single-use plastic carrier bag. Since this tax has come in the UK Government has reported that 83% few bags (over 6 million bags) has been issued in England from 7 April 2016 to 6 April 2017. This equates to each person using 25 bags (2016 – 2017) compared to 140 bags per year before the change.

This should make a massive difference to our plastic oceans. Dr Sue Kinsey from the Marine Conservation Society stated that “every year we survey our beaches, and last year (2014) we found over 5,000 bags over one weekend.

What are our options to reduce our single-use plastic bags? We can of course, use our plastic bags many times over. Or re-purpose an empty cardboard box from the supermarket and recycle it when we get home. We can also carry a wicker basket, but that tends to be inconvenient when we decide to grab some last minute essentials on our way home from work.

Divesangha, reusable bag, one-time-use plastic bag, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, recycle, reuse, presents for scuba divers, DEMA Show 2017

Enter stage left Divesangha. When this Brit manufacturer launched in Spring 2014 they made a commitment. To locally and ethically manufacturer high quality products and not use plastic in their packaging. It is therefore logical that Divesangha has now produced a unique robust reusable bag to help wean everyone off their one-time-use plastic bag habit.

This lightweight, sturdy, fashionable Turtle’ bag neatly packs down into an integrated pouch allowing you to stash it in a coat pocket, day / rucksack, handbag or laptop case. When you reach the checkout till, simply pull it out and fill it up.

The 100% white Polyester fabric is washable. This is important because one of the criticisms that the plastic bag addicts state is that “a re-usable non plastic bag could potentially end up non-hygienic after many uses”. (Our grandparents never used to worry about this?!) There is no issue here. Just put your bag in the washing machine!

Whilst the practical Divesangha Turtle Bag is about the same size as an average carrier bag, it far outperforms its littering cousin. This stylish baby – priced at £15.00 – is constructed to conveniently handle much more weight!

 

 

Present Ideas For Divers: Oxygen Measurement For Divers by John Lamb

Oxygen Measurement For Divers, rebreather divers, oxygen sensors, John Lamb, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, fuel limited sensors, storage of sensors, oxygen sensors, Paul Toomer, Mark Powell, Jill Heinerth, CCR safetyDo you have a rebreather diver in your life that you are particularly fond of?

Are you stuck for a present idea? If they don’t already possess a copy of John Lamb’s latest book, then why not pick them up a copy. It will help keep them safe(r) and provide them with accurate information on oxygen sensors.

“John Lamb’s book, ‘Oxygen Measurement For Divers’ is exactly what we have been waiting for. This book is a must read for any diver using any form of oxygen analyser, whether it is a simple oxygen analyser or in a complex rebreather.”
– Paul Toomer, Director of Diver Training, RAID

There are quite a lot of myths and misconceptions about oxygen sensors, hence earlier this year John Lamb published ‘Oxygen Measurement For Divers’. It is stuffed full of nuggets of information that every rebreather diver needs.

This book has been designed for divers to pick it up and dip into it. To check information. To look up answers.

It has achieved the happy balance of having a good technical aspect whilst remaining useful.

“This is an invaluable resource and should be compulsory reading for any rebreather diver.”
– Mark Powell, SDI / TDI / ERDI Training Advisory Panel

The explanations and illustrations are very clear and, even when describing complex principles, are structured in a very understandable way. Everything is covered from current limitation behaviour to best management practices for storage.

Oxygen Measurement For Divers, rebreather divers, oxygen sensors, John Lamb, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, fuel limited sensors, storage of sensors, oxygen sensors, Paul Toomer, Mark Powell, Jill Heinerth, CCR safety

Lamb succinctly covers key topics, explaining in plain English the reasons for sensor failure:

  • the effects of temperature, humidity and pressure
  • sensor accuracy and stability
  • testing sensors
  • Do’s and Don’ts
  • how to determine the end of a life of a sensor
  • advice for looking after your sensors

“If you want to break through the mire of misinformation and be better informed about diving safety, this is a must-read book.”
– Jill Heinerth, explorer

‘Oxygen Measurement for Divers’ can be purchased in two formats. As a paperback, direct from Vandagraph for £15.00. Or, as a Kindle book for £7.50

 

Want To Be An OWUSS Rolex Scholar? Deadline Closes In 3 Days!

owuss_rolex_diving-scholarship_rosemary-lunnAre you aged between 21 and 26? Are you considering a career in an underwater-related discipline? Are you a Rescue Diver (or equivalent) with at least 25 logged dives? Have you not yet earned your graduate degree?

Then take note and get scribbling because everyone involved with the ‘Our World Underwater Rolex Scholarship’ programme agrees on one thing. This is the world’s best scuba diving scholarship!

Currently there are three Rolex Scholarships: North America, Europe, and Australasia. Each year one scholar is selected from each of the three regions and they are provided with a hands-on introduction to underwater and other aquatic-related endeavours, working side by side with current leaders in underwater fields.

OWUSS Rolex Scholarship, Felix Butschek, Lamar Hires, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, diving scholarships, Dive Rite,

Felix Butschek – 2016 / 2017 European OWUSS Rolex Scholar – diving Peacock Springs, following a sidemount course with Lamar Hires

These experiences may include active participation in field studies, underwater research, scientific expeditions, laboratory assignments, equipment testing and design, photographic instruction, and other specialised assignments.

Yolly Bosiger, Pete Mesley, Australasian OWUSS Rolex Scholar, scuba diving scholarships, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Yolly Bosiger – 2012 / 2013 Australasian OWUSS Rolex Scholar – learned to dive rebreathers with Pete Mesley

The deadline for this life-changing scholarship‬ is coming up. You have three days – until 31st *December – to apply.

Completed Scholarship applications must be RECEIVED via the online application no later than:

31st *December 2016 – North American Application
(to be considered for the 2017 scholarship)

31st *December 31 2016 – European Application
(to be considered for the 2017 scholarship)

31st January 2017 – Australasian Application
(to be considered for the 2017 scholarship)

Remembering Britannic’s Violet Jessop

100 years ago today ‘Miss Unsinkable’ – Violet Constance Jessop –  survived the sinking of HMHS Britannic.

The Last Olympian, Ken Marschall, HMHS Britannic, Richie Kohler, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, Kea Island, The Underwater Marketing Company, Lone Wolf Productions, Simon MilsJessop originally served as an ocean liner stewardess on the White Star ship RMS Olympic. At the time this was the largest luxury liner in the World.

On 20 September 2011 Jessop was on board when the Olympic sailed from Southampton. The first Olympic class liner collided with the British warship HMS Hawk. Luckily there were no fatalities and the ship made it back to port without sinking.

Just over six months later Jessop joined the crew of the second Olympic class liner on her maiden voyage: RMS Titanic. The loss of this supposedly ‘unsinkable’ ship during the early hours of 15 April 1912 had a huge impact on the owners of the White Star line and the British maritime industry. Harland and Wolff – the Belfast shipbuilder – quickly adopted a ‘safety-first’ approach, and amended the design of their third Olympic class liner.

The Last Olympian, HMHS Britannic, Ken Marschall, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Violet Jessop

Ken Marschall is a respected maritime painter | http://www.kenmarschall.com

Britannic was born at the wrong time because she was launched on 26 February 1914 – five months before the outbreak of WWI. She therefore did not see service as a transatlantic passenger liner. Instead the British Government requisitioned the last Olympian, refitted her and repainted her. Her hull was painted white complete with large red crosses. Britannic’s role was to carry sick and injured troops home from Gallipoli. Violet Jessop joined the crew as a nurse.

On 21st November 1969 Britannic was steaming along the Kea Channel in Greece. At approximately 08.12 a violent explosion rocked the ship. The ship had hit a German mine. Despite Harland and Wolff’s major modifications, Britannic sunk within 57 minutes.

“The white pride of the ocean’s medical world … dipped her head a little, then a little lower and still lower. All the deck machinery fell into the sea like a child’s toys. Then she took a fearful plunge, her stern rearing hundreds of feet into the air until with a final roar, she disappeared into the depths.” Violet Jessop

In September 2006 I was a team member on a HMHS Britannic expedition led by Richie Kohler and John Chatterton. During the expedition I was asked to play the role of Violet Jessop for a re-enactment.

Britannic 2006 Dive Team, Joe Porter, Evan Kovacs, John Chatterton, Richie Kohler, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Martin Parker, Mike Fowler, Petar Denoble, Carl Spencer

We filmed the sequence on Sunday 24th September 2006 in Kea Harbour. The cinematographer was Evan Kovacs and the safety diver was Joe Porter, editor of Wreck Diving Magazine.

It was already a hot afternoon before I donned woollen stockings, a long dress, a big black woollen coat, long scarf and hat. The ensemble was topped off by a very bulky cork life jacket.

We quickly realised that the life jacket worked. A good thing you would think. However I had to be pulled underneath the surface to re-create the struggle that Jessop had gone through to survive the sinking. The solution. I wore my 20lb shot belt beneath the long dress.

Jumping into Kea Harbour was a blessed relief from the intense Greek sun. But the respite was short lived. Film work tends to be a lot of ‘hurry up and wait’ interspersed with some intense action. There was a lot of hanging around in the water, and I began to get cold.

And it was literally hanging around for me.  I had to hold onto something solid for surface support as my weight belt proved to be most effective at pulling me under water.

Britannic, Violet Jessop, Titanic, Simon Mills, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Richie Kohler, Petar Denoble, Evan Kovacs, scuba diving jobs,

This particular shoot took at least a couple of hours – I was filmed from all angles performing a variety of moves such as my feet kicking in the blue water. I was also shot from topside and underwater being pulled beneath Kea Harbour.

Evan asked that I jump into the water a number of times. He wanted to film me from below the surface as I replicated Jessop leaping out of the lifeboat and into the Aegean Sea.

“To my horror, I saw Britannic’s huge propellers churning and mincing up everything near them – men, boats and everything were just one ghastly whirl.” Violet Jessop

The lifeboat that Violet Jessop was in was being pulled into Britannic’s still rotating propellor. The only way to survive this giant mincing machine was to jump from the lifeboat. In doing so Violet struck her head on the keel and suffered a fractured skull.

All in all it was a great experience working with Evan and Joe on this shoot. When it was complete I climbed out of Kea Harbour with new respect for Violet Jessop. She must have been a remarkable lady.

Footnote

There have been a number of documentaries and books about HMHS Britannic. The latest book – ‘Mystery of the Last Olympian‘ – has been co-authored by Richie Kohler. Richie has dived this Olympic class liner in 2006, 2009, 2015 and 2016. He answers the century-old question as to why all the engineering solutions built into the mighty Britannic could not save her from sharing the same fate as Titanic.

#OTD Mary Rose Wreck Site Found Today

Fifty years ago today two divers – John Towse and the late Alexander McKee – pinpointed the whereabouts of King Henry VIII’s famous flagship.

Anthony Roll, Mary Rose, Alexander McKee, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Southsea BSAC, Solent, Prince Charles, Margaret Rule

The Mary Rose as depicted in the Anthony Roll

“On May 14, 1966 Alex and myself visited the penultimate resting place of the Mary Rose.” John Towse

McKee and Towse were members of Southsea BSAC (British Sub Aqua Club).

Alexander McKee’s widow stated “while we were living in Hamburg, he used to express his interest and admiration for the raising and preservation of Vasa – a Swedish warship – in 1961. I remember he said, ‘I want to make my mark in life.’ He has achieved that.”

John Towse wrote about the useful break that helped to find the ship. John and Alex discovered the location of the Mary Rose whilst looking at charts in Cricklewood. “There laid before Alex and myself was a magnificent hand-drawn chart [by the Deane brothers in 1836] of the approaches to Portsmouth Harbour. In a very short time and prompted by one of the Hydrographic Office staff, the actual charted site of the Mary Rose was clearly shown.”

In 1965 McKee initiated ‘Project Solent Ships’ in conjunction with Southsea BSAC. The aim was to investigate wrecks lost in the Solent. His real quest was to find the Tudor Warship and he was the driving force behind the hunt and discovery of this Tudor Battleship.

Mary Rose, Henry VIII, Tudor Warship, Battleship, Alexander McKee, John Towse, Southsea BSAC, OTD, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Margaret Rule, X-Ray Mag

The wreck of the Mary Rose undergoing conservation in Portsmouth Photo Credit: Mary Rose Trust

Without Alexander McKee’s dedication and pioneering work, it is likely this ship would still be buried beneath the soft Solent mud. John Lippiett, the Rear Admiral who leads the Mary Rose Trust said “The project wouldn’t be what it is today without the foresight and inspiration of Alex and the divers.” (McKee’s stubbornness was later rewarded when he received the OBE for finding the Mary Rose).

Many years of seabed searching followed. Cynics dubbed the wreck ‘McKee’s Ghost Ship’. Between 1968 and 1971 volunteer divers explored the Solent. They used sonar scans and plunged long steel rods into the soft mud until they struck timber. Then the team employed dredgers, water jets and airlifts to excavate a strange shape underneath the seabed. Alex Hildred, curator of the Mary Rose, confirmed that this was the first time that remote sensing technology sub-bottom profiling and side scan sonar had been used in England.

“We were very fortunate that on the first dive of the year [5 May 1971] we slightly missed our target—the area that we had been searching. We were about 150 metres to the south. Percy Ackland, who I always called our underwater gun dog, came up and whispered to me, ‘The timbers are down there Margaret [Rule].’” Ackland had found three of the port frames of the Mary Rose. By some miracle half of the hull had been well preserved by Solent mud. It was as though someone had chainsawed through the wreck from bow to stern and the entire starboard side of the Mary Rose survived.

SOURCES

Mary Rose Website
Obituary of Margaret Rule, X-Ray Mag
The Portsmouth News
Culture 24

On 29th August 2014 BBC Radio 4 broadcast ‘The Reunion‘ with Sue MacGregor. Sue reunited some of the members of the team of marine archaeologists, divers and engineers who raised Henry VIII’s sunken battleship Mary Rose from the sea bed in 1982. This link goes to a RAM (Real Audio File) recording of that programme.

 

The High Cost of Buying Cheap Diving Gear On-line

amazon-keyboardsA question asked on a scuba diving forum.

Beginner Advice Please

“I am a complete beginner and need to buy the kit.

Any advice on good on-line scuba diving retailers will be much appreciated.

My mate is fairly experienced, so he will be able to help me”.

 

 

Hi there

I am absolutely delighted to hear that you are thinking of buying some diving equipment. It is a researched and documented fact that if you own your own kit, you will go diving more regularly than if you haven’t got anything.

Boat fins, scuba diving fins, diving Isle of Man, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

Two pieces of core scuba diving equipment: a pair of boat fins and a dive mask

I would certainly advocate that as a new diver you get the core kit of mask, boat fins, snorkel, boots, a shortie / basic thermal protection and a timing device.

This is your basic snorkelling equipment which will last you from now until kingdom come, provided you look after it carefully. It also means that when you start / continue learning, you have the basics which will also be fine for pool work and blue water diving.

Once you have your core kit I would suggest that you don’t go on a mad spending spree – yet.

The thing about learning to dive (or any other sport for that matter) is that you don’t know, what you don’t know. This is not a criticism, just a fact of life.

It is terribly easy to peruse the magazines, let your fingers do the walking on the web or post a question on the Forums. And if you are British diver you will probably end up making the decision to buy a certain brand of BCD and regulators. But is it truly the right equipment for the style of diving you are currently doing, and what you aspire to do in the future?

Anglesey ScubaFest, scuba diving in Wales, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Jason Brown, The Underwater Marketing Company,

Attend an equipment manufacturer demo day or ScubaFest to try out new diving equpiment

To get the most out of your equipment you really need to have some in-water time and experience before you buy it. Borrow, hire, steal, beg equipment from fellow divers or your local club or dive centre and try it out. Or attend an equipment manufacturer demo day or the ScubaFests. But please pace yourself.

Try and dive ‘familiar’ diving equipment when you try out one new piece of kit to reduce the stress levels. By getting some in-water time, you will gain a mental and physical reference which enables you to start forming ideas of what equipment you want, and the route you wish to follow.

I am really glad to hear that you have an experienced mate who has taken you under his wing.

The one thing that I would say is that staff in dive centres have exposure to a large range of equipment from a number of manufacturers. They go on product days and launches, they get given the odd sample to play with, and it’s all so that they can understand the product better.

Anglesey Divers, Marting Sampson, Caroline Sampson, learn to dive in Wales, Porth Dafarch Beach, Holyhead, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Anglesey ScubaFest

Dive Centre Owner and Chief Instructor Martin Sampson (in the orange and black suit) with his students on Porth Dafarch, Anglesey, Wales. Martin and Caroline run Anglesey Divers

Dive centre staff are out there using the kit in anger, and diving it on a very regular basis. They should ask you what kind of diving are you doing now, and what do you intend to do in the future, and will advise you accordingly as to what kind of kit will suit you. This means that you will be given good solid equipment advice by someone who is more experienced than your average amateur diver.

DSMB, delayed surface marker buoy, dive reel, scuba diving equipment, diving safety, being seen on the surface, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, diving PR, scuba social media

A well stocked dive shop offering a plethora of safety accessories

The beauty about shopping in a LDS (Local Dive Shop), is that you get to feel, touch, try on and look at the equipment for real.

If you ask for help the staff will walk you around the shop and show you the difference between a pool fin, a boat fin, a nature’s wing fin, a spring strap, a traditional fin strap and a quick release strap.

Absolutely nothing can replace the opportunity of feeling, touching, smelling, lifting, finding out just how heavy something is, and trying on new up-to-date equipment. It’s almost a rite of passage for a diver to walk into a dive shop with a pocketful of cash and buy your drysuit / regulator / bcd and thoroughly delight in the frisson, thrill and excitement of that hands-on experience.

Buying on the web is just not the same thing. Pushing a button or two and waiting for a brown box to be delivered is quite pedestrian in comparison.

It should be noted it is not polite to visit a dive centre and benefit from their time, knowledge and counselling to then go and buy the product off the net for the sake of a few pounds. I have seen this happen all too often, and it is little wonder that dive centre staff sometimes end up quite jaded by this behaviour.

Fourth Element, thermacline, proteus, dry base, OceanPositive, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Jim Standing, Paul Strike, EUROTEK Award Winners

I am not saying ‘never buy from the internet’

If you buy via the web you might get a more competitive price. This is because all you are paying for is for someone to take a piece of kit off a shelf, put it into a box and post it to you. There is rarely counselling and advice, and no cup of tea.

There is no substitute to having an experienced professional standing next to you, seeing how the kit fits and knowing how it will perform in the water.

When you buy in a LDS you gain education, information and benefit from the shop’s experience.

It is worth noting that your LDS doesn’t necessarily need to be your nearest dive centre. My nearest dive centre is a is 12 minutes / 5 miles away. The one I use is 51 minutes / 28 miles away because of their great servicing, advice and gas blending. And your LDS will be ‘the one’ where you get good service, advice, mentoring and they actively go diving.

Buying on the web appears to be a great, short term gain, but you will definitely lose long term.

Now more than ever you need to support your LDS. (LDS equipment sales are one revenue source that helps to pay for rates, electricity, insurance, salaries, etc). Around the turn / start of the year I was hearing every week about yet another dive retail centre closing their doors and I know of another two dive centres that have gone down in the last 8 weeks. The blood letting continues.

Apeks, A clamp, DIN Adaptor, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Dean Martin, Aqua Lung, scuba diving equipment

We can’t buy air or gas fills online

The price you will be charged in-store is a fair one because it’s the suggested retail price. Remember diving is effectively a luxury sport where you want life support equipment that will always perform efficiently in a harsh environment. You need it to work properly and that costs real money to research, develop, test and manufacture.

By demanding cheaper equipment you will get just that. There have been comments on the Forums about cheap weight belts falling to bits, cheap clips and knives rusting up, cheap reels jamming and tangling, and I am aware of a couple of lovely masks that are sadly now just plain nasty.

These two low profile masks fitted 95% of all faces, looked great and were a sensible price. Unfortunately because the public kept on demanding cheaper masks, production was switched to another factory, and now these products are inferior and sales have dropped right off. The silicone used is horribly hard and the frames crack. By demanding cheaper kit the product has been destroyed. Everyone loses.

It is worth pointing out that I am also not saying ‘never buy from the internet’. That is just plain daft. We are very time poor these days, and when you know precisely what you need, and that it will fit you perfectly, buying on-line is a useful, timely solution. But as a new diver, or a diver upgrading key pieces of equipment, you really benefit from buying your equipment in store because of the personal hands on service you will receive. And you leave with something that properly fits you.

Cylinders, air tanks, mixed gas diving, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Divetech, nitrox, stage cylinders, The Underwater Marketing Compay, buying cheap dive gear online, scuba diving PR, rebreather diving

Do we really want to return to 100 mile round trips to get diving cylinders filled?

Whatever your position on internet sales, if they become all that we have got left, along with some very large regional centres, then not only you, but everyone will lose out.

So if you end up spending a tad more now on kit at your local dive centre, it should mean that in the future we all won’t be doing 100 mile round trips to get cylinder fills and regulators serviced which is better for our pockets and kinder to the environment. And the great thing is that we will be well looked after by like-minded kit monster professionals who still get huge thrill out of playing with shiny toys.

Good luck with your diving, I hope this helps.